The Lost City Of Z (2017) Review
Writer-director James Gray is one of our finest unsung artists, and his brilliant latest, The Lost City of Z, is deservedly the picture to really bring his craftsmanship into the fold. Simultaneously grand and intimate, thanks to an expansive scale populated...
The Salesman (2017) Review
It’s been something of a strange pre-release for Asghar Farhadi’s latest The Salesman. Even before many get the chance to see the film, it has been the subject of much talk due to events in the US in recent months, but in a strange way this all works...
Get Out (2017) Review
It’s late at night and a guy wanders through a pleasant suburb, checking his phone. Then he realises he’s being followed by a car. It’s playing Flanagan and Allen’s “Run, Rabbit, Run”. Never has that trite little song seemed so sinister,...
The Lost City Of Z (2017) Review
Writer-director James Gray is one of our finest unsung artists, and his brilliant latest, The Lost City of Z, is deservedly the picture to really bring his craftsmanship into the fold. Simultaneously grand and intimate, thanks to an expansive scale populated by profoundly rich characters, this is an existential voyage into the heart of desire, danger, and ultimately, discovery. Charlie Hunnam delivers a career-best performance as Colonel Percival... Read more
The Edge of Seventeen (2016) DVD Review
Hailee Steinfeld shines in Kelly Fremon Craig’s coming-of-age love letter to John Hughes. Steinfeld stars as the awkward Nadine, the kind of inexplicably unpopular student we’ve seen many times in American teen movies – too pretty to actually be a social outcast if it were real life, but the film pulls off convincing us she is through her social awkwardness, her off-beat dress sense and her relationship with her super-popular brother.... Read more
CHiPs (2017) Review
Television-to-film adaptations have had a checkered history over the years – while Star Trek, Mission: Impossible and Sex and the City have had success, at least in box office terms, there have been some real shockers brought to the big screen. On the other hand, The Honeymooners, The Avengers and Lost in Space and many others have failed to translate their tales. CHiPs (California Highway Patrol), the latest and long-gestating adaptation of... Read more
Life (2017) Review
The famous film proverb reads “In space, no-one can hear you scream”. Well, the one that’s been famous since 1977. Since then many have tried and failed to replicate the claustrophobic terrors of Ridley Scott’s seminal sci-fi masterpiece and now 40 years later, it’s the turn of Life to step up to the plate and try its luck. But where others have floundered, Daniel Espinosa’s alien-loose-in-space tale does very admirably... Read more
Another Mother’s Son (2017) Review
Once something of a mainstay in cinemas, films about World War II have faded into the background in recent years and the few that have made it onto the big screen have been something of a disappointment. Think of the recent Allied, the star-studded Monuments Men and Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken. Only Brad Pitt’s Fury kept comfortably kept its head above water. Sadly, the latest offering, Another Mother’s Son, seems determined to continue that downward... Read more
The Salesman (2017) Review
It’s been something of a strange pre-release for Asghar Farhadi’s latest The Salesman. Even before many get the chance to see the film, it has been the subject of much talk due to events in the US in recent months, but in a strange way this all works in its favour. Farhadi’s latest has been building in momentum and anticipation throughout the period, and indeed its recent win for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards in February only... Read more
The Olive Tree (2017) Review
Icíar Bollaín’s The Olive Tree – written by her partner Paul Laverty – is a poignant and personal account of determination. This Spanish social realist piece offers all the hallmarks of the Ken Loach collaborator’s back catalogue; such as his scripts for the Palme d’Or-winning The Wind That Shakes the Barley, and most recently I, Daniel Blake, replacing world-worn council estates with sun-kissed, foliage-rich landscapes.... Read more
Get Out (2017) Review
It’s late at night and a guy wanders through a pleasant suburb, checking his phone. Then he realises he’s being followed by a car. It’s playing Flanagan and Allen’s “Run, Rabbit, Run”. Never has that trite little song seemed so sinister, or so strangely funny, and yet it rather sets the tone for Jordan Peele’s debut as a director, Get Out. Not that he’s a complete newbie to movies, with acting and voiceover credits to his name,... Read more
Elle (2017) Review
Paul Verhoeven’s Elle – his first theatrical release in over a decade – shows that even after a prolonged absence, the Dutch provocateur hasn’t lost even an ounce of his bite. This distinctly unsettling glance into forbidden fantasy provides a glorious exploration of our psyche’s darkest recesses, exceptionally carried by Isabelle Huppert; unquestionably the finest screen actress at work today. As you’ve likely... Read more
Personal Shopper (2017) Review
Kristen Stewart is unquestionably the most exciting talent at work today, and her shimmering central performance in Parisian auteur Olivier Assayas’ Personal Shopper is absolutely mesmerising. If audiences are to see a more exquisitely textured, thematically complex role in 2017, then they are beyond lucky. This kaleidoscopic vision of ethereal intrigue provides a simply uncategorisable cinematic experience which is destined to divide,... Read more
The Flash Season 3 Episode 15 – “The Wrath of Savitar” Review
Following two weeks of gorilla warfare, The Flash came full circle this week to focus on the presence of Savitar and just how he is set to pull the team apart with his immense power and abilities. An episode that reminds us just how strong the villains are within the show, “The Wrath of Savitar” proves to be one of the best episodes of the season so far. With last week closing with Wally having a vision of Savitar, we all knew that trouble... Read more
Catfight (2017) Review
If there is a single lesson to learn from writer-director Onur Tukel’s ferociously brutal Catfight, it’s this: people are horrible. Products of our ever-changing, corporately-fixated environments, we are spiteful, selfish creatures who gain satisfaction from bettering and belittling those in our proximity. Life is a cruel competition, and you most certainly don’t want to among the losers. Whilst this might not be entirely true in... Read more