All I See Is You DVD Review All I See Is You DVD Review
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Lively shines in yet another low-par Forster directorial effort. Marc Forster’s CV hardly reads as the most positive and revitalising directorial careers in Hollywood.... All I See Is You DVD Review

Lively shines in yet another low-par Forster directorial effort.

Marc Forster’s CV hardly reads as the most positive and revitalising directorial careers in Hollywood. Despite his fantastic Monster’s Ball, Forster has since faltered with the likes of Machine Gun Preacher and the much criticised World War Z among others all dragging him down, and his latest film All I See Is You sadly shows the cracks once more. What starts as an admittedly promising film, soon becomes more of the same from the man who somewhat helped us to realise that the zombie sub-genre can be done with incredible dullness.

Husband and wife, James (Jason Clarke) and Gina (Blake Lively) live in Bangkok, where they live their lives under the difficulties of Gina having lost all but 5% of her sight following an accident when she was much younger. Her lack of sight means that her husband is essentially acting as her eyes and her carer, but with the possibility of gaining her eyesight back with a simple procedure on the horizon it looks like things may turn for the better for couple – or at least that would be the assumption on the surface…

From its striking first third, it’s clear that Forster has a keen eye for visual splendour in All I See Is You, especially considering his focal point is indeed a blind woman. Along with cinematographer Matthias Koenigswieser, the director paints a mesmerising picture of a kaleidoscopic blind-side vision which helps us to understand just how Lively’s Gina sees the world. It adds to the depth created by Lively in yet another stellar performance as she continues to prove to the world that she is way beyond those Gossip Girl days. But unfortunately that’s where it all ends, with the promise of sight soon seeing the film descend into predictable and yawn-worthy realms.

As character traits change with the ongoing events and we slowly build towards that inevitable conclusion that you can see from a mile away (pun fully intended), the film simply comes stuck in a world of mediocrity, only being helped along by Lively’s intuition and strength in her own role. It just feels all too simple and smooth, with the direction feeling like a smooth Sunday stroll rather than biting, inviting and engaging. It’s a real shame too, as All I See Is You sets up beautifully with its striking visuals and story setup but misses the mark massively in its ultimate delivery.

All I See Is You is out on DVD now.

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Jon Dingle Editor

A film journalist, writer and a filmmaker in business for over 20 years. I am passionate about movies, television series, music and online games.